Dec
11
2012

I’m leaving this post as a reminder to study how to create a plugin in IntelliJ IDEA to support some commonly done stuff in IPC java framework.

 

http://tv.jetbrains.net/videocontent/live-coding-an-intellij-idea-plugin-from-scratch

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Jan
31
2012

Not so with ideas or talent. These are the purchases of aspiration: Imagine if we took that scrappy idea with those underpaid, hungry champions, and we gave them all the resources in the world. They could paint all the colors of the rainbow and still have pixie dust left to spare!Turns out that good ideas and strong talent is as fickle as it is seducing. As soon as you start making big-company compromises, the good idea turns average, and the average turns into a write-off.Same goes with strong talent. As soon as they have to deal with three layers of reporting, quarterly budget cycles, and swing-door managers, they turn off the creativity and head for the exit. The latter part might take from three months to two years, but it will happen.

via You can not buy ideas or talent – 37signals.

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Jan
02
2012

FTS 2012 01 02

Posted by: angol in Categories: personal AnGoL, work/career.

FTS in my definitions is Fuck That Shit or Fuck This Shit, the words are too common and near for the win that they probably are widely used,

 

The rant today is due to having two managers to report to.

Two managers with different management styles who seem to never talk to each other.

Two managers who need to be reminded that you have other deliverables.

 

This is a recipe for mediocrity. Having to do lots of stuff with almost the same deadlines.

 

Let it be said that I don’t actually hate my managers far from it. It’s the situation that we are all in that is the reason for this. Fuck This Shit.

One day when the FTS days get too often too much the FTS becomes FTS I Quit.

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Nov
01
2011

It is probably best to strive for a balance between job satisfaction and pay, and not to worry too much about the titles. Worry about whether or not your work brings you pride, whether it is interesting, and whether it brings a smile to your face when you think about it, or when you tell others about it. About whether or not what you do is meaningful and whether it affects peoples lives in a positive way. If you do feel that your title is a major factor in how much you earn or are appreciated you may want to ask yourself if you’re working in the right place and on the right stuff to begin with.

Pay is important, but above a certain level you’ll find that job satisfaction is literally priceless.

I am a programmer. And I’m proud of that.

via I am a programmer | jacquesmattheij.com.

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Oct
26
2011

They’re not mutually exclusive qualities, of course. One of the best examples of passion combined with professionalism was Vincent Van Gogh. There’s a lot of shallow psychoanalyzing about Van Gogh — “his paintings are so distinctive because he was mad,” and so forth.

But Van Gogh was no naïve artist operating on raw talent and passion alone. If you read his letters, you discover that he was a well-educated scholar of art, much influenced by the ideas of others.

His passion kept him going when nobody would buy his works, but it was his professionalism — his endless desire to learn more and do better, that exploited his talent to its fullest. Van Gogh’s early works didn’t amount to much. It was his growth as a serious, thoughtful, professional artist that turned him into what he became.

In fact, his bouts of madness had nothing to do with it; they disturbed his thinking and prevented him from painting. If anything, his work is all the more impressive because he was able to do it in spite of, not because of, his illness.

It’s time for a moratorium on recruitment ads that demand passion. It sounds cool, but ultimately, it’s meaningless except as an excuse for demanding long hours and offering poor benefits. By itself, it’s not much use to development companies, either.

Passion is no guarantee of talent or even basic competence. Ability, pride, discipline, integrity, dedication, organization, communication, and social skills are much more useful to an employer than passion is. And they’re more useful to you, too.

via Gamasutra – Features – The Designer’s Notebook: Passion Versus Professionalism.

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May
18
2010

rePost :: ::Why Engineers Hop Jobs

Posted by: angol in Categories: Career, rePosts, work/career.

Well I’m as unreliable, lazy, and entitled as the next guy, but that’s not why I’ve hopped jobs in the past. People in my generation have a very low tolerance for bullshit, and software engineering, in general, is a very high bullshit career. If you couple that with the standard load of bullshit you would get from a non-technical Harvard MBA type boss — like many CEOs that you find trying to get rich in Silicon Valley by hiring some engineers to “code up this idea real quick” — it’s no wonder that a good engineer will walk off the job after his one year cliff vesting.

As an engineer, you are told that you’re “lucky to have a job”, because there are “a hundred people lined up outside, ready to take it”. (As chance would have it, there are at least a thousand lined up to take the job of rich prick who tells people what to do). This backlash is the product of diseased thinking. A CEO who makes an engineer work 80 hours a week is a driven entrepreneur, but an engineer asking for a comfy chair is a prima donna. So, when we are up to our knees in golf-course, martini-lunch bullshit, don’t be surprised when we jump ship for a higher salary.

via Why Engineers Hop Jobs.

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May
18
2010

Was listening to this episode of This American Life and what hit me was how much these autoworkers were proud of their work. I hope we can all have this attitude towards what we do.

A car plant in Fremont California that might have saved the U.S. car industry. In 1984, General Motors and Toyota opened NUMMI as a joint venture. Toyota showed GM the secrets of its production system: how it made cars of much higher quality and much lower cost than GM achieved. Frank Langfitt explains why GM didn't learn the lessons – until it was too late.

via NUMMI | This American Life.

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Apr
13
2010

Postscript: This is a little unfair. Normal people with lives in the neighborhood, aren’t doing this every day or even most days. And in fact the volume of really-late and really-early messaging is less than at other jobs I’ve had. But, if you like your work, it’s sure easy to get through a whole lot each day.

via ongoing by Tim Bray · Life at Google.

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Apr
11
2010

soo true.

It’s time to finally put the performance review out of its misery.

This corporate sham is one of the most insidious, most damaging, and yet most ubiquitous of corporate activities. Everybody does it, and almost everyone who’s evaluated hates it. It’s a pretentious, bogus practice that produces absolutely nothing that any thinking executive should call a corporate plus.

And yet few people do anything to kill it. Well, it’s time they did.

Don’t get me wrong: Reviewing performance is good; it should happen every day. But employees need evaluations they can believe, not the fraudulent ones they receive. They need evaluations that are dictated by need, not a date on the calendar. They need evaluations that make them strive to improve, not pretend they are perfect.

via Yes, Everyone Really Does Hate Performance Reviews – WSJ.com.

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Apr
05
2010

Want to be a person? Remember: Managers tell employees what to do and make sure they do it.

With people, they have conversations about things that matter to them.

via The importance of being a person | IS Survivor Publishing.

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