Aug
15
2012

Sad State of PAGASA

Posted by: angol in Categories: personal AnGoL, Philippines, Science.

It seems the employees of PAGASA after 5 months of keeping silent have all but lost hope in their sad plight.

It seems because of lack of fnds their SALA (Subsistence Allowance and Living Allowance) and Hazard pay has not been given to them.

This effectively reduces their gross pays by about 10-35% according to reports on TV.

This is sad because highly specialized/ highly skilled individuals like those of PAGASA really can walk away and transfer to other nations where they probably will have a better career and life in general. As is apparent from their muted protest and a marked guilt in protesting the people of PAGASA are doing this with a heavy heart.

 

 

I hope the good people of the DBM find ways to make the plight of their fellow government employees better.

 

I hope we can find a way to help our government scientist and specialist continue serving our country while not causing a disservice to their families.

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Apr
16
2012

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Mar
26
2012

Andy Bowen, project manager and principal developer of the Nereus, an ROV that explored Challenger Deep in 2009, said a manned mission also has the potential to inspire public imagination in a way a robot can’t.

“It’s difficult to anthropomorphize machines in a way that engages everyone’s imagination—not in the same way that having boots on the ground, so to speak, can do,” said Bowen, who’s not an expedition member.

Biological oceanographer Lisa Levin, also at Scripps, said that the DEEPSEA CHALLENGE program’s potential for generating public interest in deep-ocean science is as important as any new species Cameron might have discovered.

“I consider Cameron to be doing for the trenches what Jacques Cousteau did for the ocean many decades ago,” said Levin, who’s part of the team but did not participate in the seagoing expedition.

At a time of fast-shrinking funds for undersea research, “what scientists need is the public support to be able to continue exploration and research of the deep ocean,” Levin said.

(Video: Cameron Dive First Attempt in Over 50 Years.)

Perhaps referring to his friend’s most recent movie, expedition physician MacInnis called Cameron a real-world “avatar.”

“He’s down there on behalf of everybody else on this planet,” he said. “There are seven billion people who can’t go, and he can. And he’s aware of that.”

For his part, Cameron seems sure that the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER will be exploring the depths for a long time to come. In fact, he’s so confident in his star vehicle, he started mulling sequels even before today’s trench dive.

Phase two might include adding a thin fiber-optic tether to the ship, which “would allow science observers at the surface to see the images in real time,” said Cameron, a National Geographic Society explorer-in-residence.

via James Cameron Completes Record-Breaking Mariana Trench Dive.

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Nov
26
2011

I’ve dreamed of having a farm for a long time. I’ve even periodically looked at the prices of lands in different provinces, sketched what I could probably do with it, etc. In short it is one of those long time projects that I will do when I have the capital to spend. For now the knowledge is what I’m building up on.

One of the realizations of this is that as long as the peace and order situation of a lot of undeveloped provinces outside metro manila is resolved farming on the classic sense is just not feasible. Most endeavors have a minimum viable size and the minimum viable size for a classic farm is the size that attracts rent seekers such as govt officials or the parallel govt in impoverished provinces the secessionist.

A few months back I read from Marginal Revolutions blog (If memory serves me right) that Sweden or at least European country you would least expect is a net exporter of food stuffs because its advanced chemical and electronics industry allowed it to go into hydrophonics in a big way. I filed this under study for your farming dreams and also under the fuck if we only had competent leaders we would probably be exporting food again.

While watching this TED talk for some reason tears were coming, I’ve probably been very happy these past days and to see something like this wow, TG. Damn I’ve been very lazy lately. This is only the beginning.

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Nov
06
2011

WOW there is hope!
Cancer needs to be cured now!!!!

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Oct
20
2011

Quantum levitation!

Posted by: angol in Categories: rePosts, Science, Social Events.

What the what? This video gives a little more explanation into the effect at work here (superconductivity + quantum trapping of the magnetic field in quantum flux tubes) and an awesome demonstration of a crude rail system. You can almost hear your tiny mind explode when the “train” goes upside-down.

via Quantum levitation!.

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Aug
02
2011

Science please advance enough before I eat myself to death. I need a miracle drug. wink wink!!

Why Diets Don’t Work? Starved Brain Cells Eat Themselves

ScienceDaily (Aug. 2, 2011) — A report in the August issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism might help to explain why it’s so frustratingly difficult to stick to a diet. When we don’t eat, hunger-inducing neurons in the brain start eating bits of themselves. That act of self-cannibalism turns up a hunger signal to prompt eating.

“A pathway that is really important for every cell to turn over components in a kind of housekeeping process is also required to regulate appetite,” said Rajat Singh of Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

The cellular process uncovered in neurons of the brain’s hypothalamus is known as autophagy (literally self-eating.) Singh says the new findings in mice suggest that treatments aimed at blocking autophagy may prove useful as hunger-fighting weapons in the war against obesity.

The new evidence shows that lipids within the so-called agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons are mobilized following autophagy, generating free fatty acids. Those fatty acids in turn boost levels of AgRP, itself a hunger signal.

via Why diets don’t work? Starved brain cells eat themselves.

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Apr
30
2011

I wish people were more sensitive to introverts.

 

A section of Laney’s book maps out the human brain and explains how neuro-transmitters follow different dominant paths in the nervous systems of Introverts and Extroverts. If the science behind the book is correct, it turns out that Introverts are people who are over-sensitive to Dopamine, so too much external stimulation overdoses and exhausts them. Conversely, Extroverts can’t get enough Dopamine, and they require Adrenaline for their brains to create it. Extroverts also have a shorter pathway and less blood-flow to the brain. The messages of an Extrovert’s nervous system mostly bypass the Broca’s area in the frontal lobe, which is where a large portion of contemplation takes place.

Unfortunately, according to the book, only about 25% of people are Introverts. There are even fewer that are as extreme as I am. This leads to a lot of misunderstandings, since society doesn’t have very much experience with my people. (I love being able to say that.)

via 10 Myths About Introverts || CarlKingCreative.com || Los Angeles, CA.

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Apr
06
2011

Damn this actually tingled my spine, I need a symbiote, hehe.

 

In 1888, a biologist called Henry Orr was collecting spotted salamander eggs from a small, swampy pool when he noticed that some of them were green. He wrote, “The internal membrane of each egg was coloured a uniform light green by the presence in the membrane of a large number of minute globular green Algae.” Orr decided that the eggs “present a remarkable case of symbiosis.” The salamanders and the algae co-existed in a mutually beneficial relationship.

Orr was right that the two species have formed a partnership, but he was wrong in one crucial regard. He thought that the algae (Oophila amblystomatis) simply hung around next to the salamander embryos in the same egg. They don’t. More than 120 years later, Ryan Kerney from Dalhousie University has found that the algae actually invade the cells of the growing embryo, becoming part of its body.

With algae inside them, the salamanders become solar-powered animals, capable of directly harnessing the energy of the sun in the style of plants.

The spotted salamander isn’t the only animal to form partnerships with algae. The emerald green sea slug steals the genes and photosynthetic factories from a type of algae that it eats. Coral reefs are built upon a partnership between corals – a type of animal – and algae that provide them with energy. Many other animals, from sponges to worms have developed similar alliances. But the spotted salamander is the only back-boned animal (vertebrate) to have done so.

Since Orr’s discovery, several scientists have teased apart the details of this relationship. With algae in their eggs, the salamanders are more likely to hatch, they do so earlier, and they’re bigger and more developed when they emerge. All of this depends on light – the algae need it to photosynthesise and provide nutrients and oxygen to the embryos. If the eggs are kept in darkness, they never accumulate algae. In return for their services, the algae feast upon the salmanaders’ waste; if they are presented with eggs that have no embryos inside them, they hardly grow.

via Solar salamanders have algae in their cells | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine.

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Apr
01
2011

We could then stop arguing about wind mills, deepwater drilling, IPCC hockey sticks, or strategic reliance on the Kremlin. History will move on fast.

Muddling on with the status quo is not a grown-up policy. The International Energy Agency says the world must invest $26 trillion (£16.7 trillion) over the next 20 years to avert an energy shock. The scramble for scarce fuel is already leading to friction between China, India, and the West.

There is no certain bet in nuclear physics but work by Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) on the use of thorium as a cheap, clean and safe alternative to uranium in reactors may be the magic bullet we have all been hoping for, though we have barely begun to crack the potential of solar power.

Dr Rubbia says a tonne of the silvery metal – named after the Norse god of thunder, who also gave us Thor’s day or Thursday – produces as much energy as 200 tonnes of uranium, or 3,500,000 tonnes of coal. A mere fistful would light London for a week.

Thorium burns the plutonium residue left by uranium reactors, acting as an eco-cleaner. “It’s the Big One,” said Kirk Sorensen, a former NASA rocket engineer and now chief nuclear technologist at Teledyne Brown Engineering.

“Once you start looking more closely, it blows your mind away. You can run civilisation on thorium for hundreds of thousands of years, and it’s essentially free. You don’t have to deal with uranium cartels,” he said.

Thorium is so common that miners treat it as a nuisance, a radioactive by-product if they try to dig up rare earth metals. The US and Australia are full of the stuff. So are the granite rocks of Cornwall. You do not need much: all is potentially usable as fuel, compared to just 0.7pc for uranium.

via Obama could kill fossil fuels overnight with a nuclear dash for thorium – Telegraph.

Is the science of this sound? WTF.

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