What’s a mid-career software engineer actually worth? Try $779,000 per year as a lower bound. | Michael O. Church

I would argue, even, that programmer salaries are low when taking a historical perspective. The trend is flat, adjusting for inflation, but the jobs are worse. Thirty years ago, programming was an R&D job. Programmers had a lot of autonomy: the kind of autonomy that it takes if one is going to invent C or Unix or the Internet or a new neural network architecture. Programmers controlled how they worked and what they worked on, and either answered to other programmers or to well-read scientists, rather than anti-intellectual businessmen who regard them as cost centers. Historically, companies sincerely committed to their employees’ careers and training. You didn’t have to change jobs every 2 years just to keep getting good projects and stay employable. The nature of the programming job, over the past couple decades, has become more stressful (open-plan offices) and careers have become shorter (ageism). Job volatility (unexpected layoffs and, even, phony “performance-based” firings in lieu of proper layoffs, in order to skimp on severance because that’s “the startup way”) has increased. With all the negatives associated with a programming job in 2014, that just didn’t exist in the 1970s to ’80s, flat performance on the salary curve is disappointing. Finally, salaries in the Bay Area and New York have kept abreast of general inflation, but the costs of living have skyrocketed in those “star cities”, while the economies of the still-affordable second-tier cities have declined. In the 1980s and ’90s, there were more locations in which a person could have a proper career, and that kept housing prices down. In 2014, that $142,000 doesn’t even enable one to buy a house in a place where there are jobs.

via What’s a mid-career software engineer actually worth? Try $779,000 per year as a lower bound. | Michael O. Church.