Mar
26
2012

Andy Bowen, project manager and principal developer of the Nereus, an ROV that explored Challenger Deep in 2009, said a manned mission also has the potential to inspire public imagination in a way a robot can’t.

“It’s difficult to anthropomorphize machines in a way that engages everyone’s imagination—not in the same way that having boots on the ground, so to speak, can do,” said Bowen, who’s not an expedition member.

Biological oceanographer Lisa Levin, also at Scripps, said that the DEEPSEA CHALLENGE program’s potential for generating public interest in deep-ocean science is as important as any new species Cameron might have discovered.

“I consider Cameron to be doing for the trenches what Jacques Cousteau did for the ocean many decades ago,” said Levin, who’s part of the team but did not participate in the seagoing expedition.

At a time of fast-shrinking funds for undersea research, “what scientists need is the public support to be able to continue exploration and research of the deep ocean,” Levin said.

(Video: Cameron Dive First Attempt in Over 50 Years.)

Perhaps referring to his friend’s most recent movie, expedition physician MacInnis called Cameron a real-world “avatar.”

“He’s down there on behalf of everybody else on this planet,” he said. “There are seven billion people who can’t go, and he can. And he’s aware of that.”

For his part, Cameron seems sure that the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER will be exploring the depths for a long time to come. In fact, he’s so confident in his star vehicle, he started mulling sequels even before today’s trench dive.

Phase two might include adding a thin fiber-optic tether to the ship, which “would allow science observers at the surface to see the images in real time,” said Cameron, a National Geographic Society explorer-in-residence.

via James Cameron Completes Record-Breaking Mariana Trench Dive.

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Mar
26
2012

Gemütlichkeit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gemütlichkeit (German pronunciation: [ɡəˈmyːtlɪçkaɪt] ( listen)) is a German abstract noun that has been adopted into English.[1] It is a derivation of gemütlich, itself the adjective of Gemüt the German word for “heart, mind, temper, feeling” expressed by (and cognate with) English mood.

Gemütlichkeit describes an environment or state of mind conductive to a cheerful mood and peace of mind, with connotation of a notion of belonging and social acceptance, of being cozy and unhurried. The current meaning of the word derives from its use in the Biedermeier period. By the second half of the 19th century, it also became associated with a set of traits supposedly unique to Germans and German culture.

via Gemütlichkeit – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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On the 8 Spot is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache